Five Ways To Handle Rejection (And Five Things Not To Do)

Howdy, howdy! The first week of July kind of disappeared into thin air. I have no idea where it went, but that’s been this whole year for me. Anyway, as many of you know, I’ve started another agent search. What does that mean? It means my next few months will be filled with even more rejection than usual. Depressing, right? But that’s the way it is when it you’re trying to make a career out of writing. I realize I’ve posted about rejection before, but it’s been a while and I’ve learned a lot since then, including things I wish I didn’t know (looking at you don’t #1). So, I thought I would update my rejection advice with five ways to handle it and five things not to do.

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Do #1: Print out your rejections and burn them or rip them up or reupholster your office chair with them. Whatever makes you feel better. I just save them and when I get an acceptance, I scroll through and stick my tongue out at every rejection for that particular story. It’s childish, but it works for me.

Don’t #1: For the love of whatever you worship, do NOT write someone back and cuss them out or demand an explanation. Just take the no and move on. I never even thought that would be a thing until I started slushing. I’ve been lucky. The only emails I’ve received were thank yous for taking the time to comment and one polite request for suggestions of other places to submit. But I know people who have gotten really rude and occasionally threatening responses. Don’t do that.

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Do #2: Acknowledge that writing is extremely subjective. Not everyone is going to like what you submit. That’s not your fault. The story just might not have been a good fit like the rejection says.

Don’t #2: Don’t take form rejections to heart. They usually just mean your story wasn’t a good fit for that person or venue. It’s not a comment on your writing ability.

Do #3: Be proud of a personal rejection. I know you’re thinking “but it’s still a rejection!” Yeah, but it means either the story or writing caught the person’s attention enough that they want to help you improve on it.

Don’t #3: Unless specifically stated, a personal rejection is not an invitation to revise and resubmit. Don’t make the mistake of thinking it is. If there’s nothing in the letter about it, check their guidelines.

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Do #4: Take a break. Rejections can get depressing. It’s okay to take a break from writing and/or submitting when you start to feel burned out. We all need to take care of ourselves.

Don’t #4: Making the decision to stop writing isn’t something you should do rashly. If you’re overwhelmed by the rejection, take some time away. Don’t immediately declare that you’re never going to write again. Cool off and weigh the pros and cons rationally.

Do #5: Get a second creative outlet. Preferably something new, so you aren’t as critical of yourself when you’re doing it. Something for fun, not work.

Don’t #5: Try not to forget that writing is work. Sure, you’re passionate about it, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t draining.

That’s my advice this week. I’m sure I won’t listen to myself about much of this. Who takes their own advice? But take from it what you will. What is some advice you have for dealing with rejection? As always, feel free to share your comments here or on my social media pages!

The Agent Hunt Begins

Hello, hello! How is everyone’s May going? Are you still staying at home? Is your area opening back up? North Texas is opening new stuff every week or so, but Dallas county alone is still gaining around 250 new cases every day. Needless to say, Dad and I are staying home for the foreseeable future. What does that mean for my productivity? Nothing. I’ve been pretty lazy the last couple of weeks. I know what I should be doing, but I can’t find the motivation. At least I couldn’t find it until I got an email on Monday informing my that the next PitDark is on the 21st. That means I have about a week to get my shit together and get ready to start my agent hunt. What does that entail? Panic. And some other stuff I’ll ramble about right now.

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Borrowed the image from the site listed on it. Click here for the link.

First, if you’re not familiar with Twitter pitch sessions (and you haven’t clicked the link under the picture), you’re probably wondering what PitDark is. It’s a chance for writers of horror/dark fantasy/murder mysteries/anything on the darker side to pitch completed manuscripts to participating agents and publishers. Anything from middle grade to adult is welcome. Basically, you post a Tweet-length pitch with all of the appropriate hashtags (see the website above for that info) up to once an hour per manuscript from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Eastern time) on May 21st and if an agent or publisher hits the little heart button, it’s an invitation to query them if you want to.

Luckily, I’ve finished my revisions of DS1 and also completed a round of edits for consistency and grammar and typos. I’ve just been trying to convince myself to prepare everything I’ll need in order to query agents. What does that include? Most importantly, a query letter that contains a blurb about the book to hook the agent (basically like what you find on the back of books to let you know what they’re about), a brief summary of my publication history, anything unique about me that informs my writing of this particular book, and a brief introduction reminding them if we’ve met or why we might work well together just to show I’ve done my research. Sometimes, that letter and the first few pages (or chapters) of the book are all you need. But some agents also require a synopsis. There’s the standard 1-2 page synopsis that introduces everything, but doesn’t necessarily spoil the ending. Most of the time, that’s enough. However, there’s also the 3-5 page synopsis that gives away everything. Some agents ask for that or both types of synopses. In other words, I have to write all of these things PLUS a Tweet-length pitch if I want to participate in PitDark and be ready to submit to someone if they like my pitch.

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And that’s not all. I also need to research agents. This I can do as I go along or after PitDark is over in the event that I don’t get a bite. The list of participating agents on the PitDark website is a good place for me to start. I can look at their preferences and see if we might be a good fit, then query them if they’re accepting unsolicited queries. I can also look at other agents within the bigger agencies to see if I can find a better fit. Some agencies have the policy that a no from one agent is a no from them all. Other agencies allow you to query multiple agents (one at a time of course). So, it’s good to find agents who are looking for work similar to your own instead of randomly querying everyone. I have a list of 101 agents from when I queried for G&G, but most of them wouldn’t be interested in DS1. However, I can use my list as another starting point because I listed the agencies they were with as well, so I can look at other agents in each agency. Otherwise, there’s always Google and checking to see who reps authors of similar works and a million other sources it would take too long to list.

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Anyway, my next few days will consist of writing a query letter and two synopses. If you notice my Twitter feed spammed with hourly pitches on the 21st, now you’ll know why. I’m not crazy, I’m just searching for an agent. As always, feel free to post your thoughts or comments or advice or good vibes or whatever here or on my social media pages!

Goal Check-In

Howdy, howdy!  How is everyone doing?  Is 2020 treating you well?  It has been a quiet month for me.  I’ve been working hard.  And since I have nothing to really talk about right now, I thought I would let you know how my goals are going thus far.  I mean, it’s only been 22 days, but I’m a little impressed by how well I’m keeping up with things.  I’ve usually dropped the ball on at least one of my goals by now.  I can admit that.  But not this time.  Not yet.

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Dropping the ball and judgment all in one GIF.

Revision: I’m a little more than a quarter of the way through the major changes in DS1. I fell behind a little last week because some unforeseen errands popped up, but I managed to tack some extra words on my writing days to make up for the 1,000 words I missed.  I’m still on track to meet my March 20th deadline.  February might upset this rhythm a little bit (one of my favorite people is coming to visit one weekend! Yay!), but I can play around with word count to catch up on anything I miss if I really want to.  Or I can just be happy that I’ll still be ahead of my April 30th deadline because I’m lazy.

Reading: I’ve finished 2 books so far.  One of them, I will be reviewing either next week or the end of February (I haven’t decided).  The other book was my first re-read of the year: The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.  It wasn’t as fun this time around.  I’m hoping the series gets better as I get further in because I don’t remember much about the other books at all.  I’m also currently reading two other books.  One will be my review book for next week or February depending on how fast I can finish it.  The other is a book of essays.  You can stalk me on GoodReads if you want to see exactly what I’m reading.

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Submitting and querying: I’m still submitting two pieces a week.  I’ve got a couple of pieces shortlisted (fingers crossed) and have already received a few rejections this year.  As far as querying goes, that has to wait until I’m done with revisions, so as long as they’re on track, I consider my querying goal on track.

Crocheting: It’s been slow since I’m focusing on revision, but I am still doing it.  Some days I don’t crochet at all, but even if I can only squeeze in a half hour’s worth, I try to do it.  I think once I’m done with revising and back on a writing schedule, I’ll have a little more free time.  Not much, but a little.

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Accurate.

Socializing: This wasn’t actually a goal, but I thought I’d mention it.  I’m doing better than usual.  As I said, someone is coming to visit in February.  And I’ve been texting people in a semi-timely fashion.  I still need to write a couple of letters.  One of which I will write as soon as I’m done with this post.

So yeah.  I think I’m doing pretty well.  Are you keeping up with your goals for the year or month or week?  As always, feel free to share your thoughts and comments here or on my social media pages!

Self-Imposed Deadlines: Do They Work?

Hello, hello!  How did your first week of 2020 go?  Were you as productive as you wanted to be?  My week has been pretty good.  I made a revision schedule for DS1 and came up with two deadlines (the ideal one versus the actual one).  I’ll share them with you along with my thoughts on self-imposed deadlines in a moment, but first I wanted to say that I’m ahead of schedule and (so far) sticking to the goals necessary to complete the revisions ahead of my ideal schedule.  I’m not crocheting as much as I want, but I’ll eventually find a balance.  Anyway, the year has been good and productive thus far!  Huzzah!

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Go me! I’m not above celebrating myself.

So, like I said, I made a revision schedule for DS1. If I revise a 1,000-word chunk four days a week, I will be able to finish the second draft of this novel (draft one was 66,100ish words) by April 30th. That’s my actual goal.  It’s realistic and easily doable even if I fall a little behind.  Why only four days a week?  Because Sunday is shower day, which is an all day thing; Tuesday (or sometimes Monday) is blog writing day, which I usually don’t feel like do anything productive afterwards; and one day a week for doctor’s appointments, errands, crocheting, or just me time.  I think that’s a reasonable schedule at this point.  However, if I continue with the same basic schedule, just with revising 1,500-word chunks, my finish date becomes March 20th (my ideal deadline).  So far, I’m keeping up with the latter date, plus I already had about 2,000 words revised that held up well under scrutiny, so I’m ahead of the March 20th deadline by about a day.

I realize that these are self-imposed deadlines, which a lot of people think are useless.  There aren’t any real consequences if I miss them, so are they really that helpful?  For me, the answer is yes and no.  Let’s tackle the no first.  The efficacy of self-imposed deadlines really depends on my mood.  If I’m feeling depressed and unmotivated and all of that, a self-imposed deadline means absolutely nothing to me.  All it does is make me feel worse because I let myself down.  You give me a deadline for a paying job or if I’m taking a class or something and I’ll get everything done a day early come Hell or high water.  But a self-imposed deadline doesn’t offer me the same kind of motivation.

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Accurate.

If that’s the case, then how are self-imposed deadlines helpful to me?  Because they remind me that I have my own pace.  That I know my own abilities.  In a couple of weeks, when I’m looking at my revisions and upset that I’m not closer to the end, I will be able to look at my deadlines and remind myself that I’m on track according to my own abilities.  I’m not capable of writing 5,000 words in one sitting.  I can’t fully revise 6,500 words in one day.  Other people can.  I’m not them.  And having those self-imposed deadlines reminds me that I have a plan, that I made this plan for a reason and it’s catered to my own abilities.  It helps me from getting too discouraged.

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I think.

What are your thoughts on self-imposed deadlines?  Are they helpful to you?  Do you stick with them?  As usual, feel free to share your thoughts and comments here or on my social media pages!

Shameless Self-Promotion: CNF Edition

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Hello, hello!  I didn’t really plan on putting this out there, mainly because Creative Non-Fiction (CNF) isn’t my forte.  But then, I wondered why not?  Yes, my life is boring.  No, I don’t particularly enjoy writing about it.  But, a while back, I wrote a short essay about my feelings toward doctors (one doctor in particular, actually).  I’ve been submitting it places with little hope of it finding a home.  Anyway, I recently found out that it’s a finalist in the Pen 2 Paper writing competition.  It’s called “Wrap Me up and Tie it with a Bow” and you can find it under Non-Fiction in the link above.  Names have been changed and I’m sure some of the details are off (who can clearly remember that far back?), but the gist is true.  Feel free to take a look.  And keep all appropriate appendages crossed for me when they announce the winners.

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Pen 2 Paper is the Coalition of Texans with Disabilities’ annual creative writing competition.  It has been around for at least nine years now and currently has four categories in which people can enter: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and comics.  You don’t have to be a Texan to submit.  You don’t even have to be cripple according to the guidelines.  But disability does have to be a main theme of the story/poem.  The goals of the competition are to give writers with disabilities a forum where they can share their work; bring awareness to disability issues through the arts; and challenge all people of all ages to think, rethink, and express their stories, perspectives, fears, and discoveries about disability.

I think what they’re trying to accomplish is interesting and I’m proud to be a small part of it.  With more than 400 submissions this go around, it’s obvious they’ve built a strong competition over the years.  Plus, it’s one of very few writing venues where I don’t have to worry about being the token cripple.

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Happy dance!

Anyway, I think I’ll leave it at that.  Please do check out my essay, “Wrap Me up and Tie it with a Bow.”  Feel free to let me know what you think of it here or on my social media pages.  Also, check my publication page on my website to look at any of my stuff you may have missed.  I’ll be back next week with my usual randomness!  See you then!

Five Legendary Creatures I Want To Write About

Hello, hello!  I’ve been reading through my paranormal cozy mystery in preparation of revising it and it has me thinking about future stories in that world.  I already have the gist of two more books brewing, but that doesn’t stop me from wondering what kind of monsters or creatures I want to include in other sequels.  So, I thought I would share some of the legendary creatures that I’m currently fixated on.

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1. Werewolves.  Humans who transform during the full moon, not that I really need to explain what they are.  Anyway, I don’t particularly want to go the stereotypical route with werewolves, and I know the trope is kind of played out, but I still like them.  Same with vampires.  I just have to find a way to make them my own.  Luckily, I have some time since the next two books are basically planned, though one of those might get pushed back in the order of the sequels.

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Selkie by Selina Fenech.

2. Sirens or Selkies.  I know they’re completely different, but I’m lumping them together anyway.  Sirens lure sailors to their death with song.  They would definitely work in a cozy series.  But!  I really love the myth of Selkies, seal folk who shed their skin to become humans.  They aren’t typically murderous, so I’d have to figure out exactly how to use them in a cozy.  I could do it.  And yes, I know both of these tropes are currently in their death throes as well.  I don’t really care.

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3. The Yuki-onna, or snow woman.  There are a lot of variations on this myth, but they all include a woman who appears from the snow and disappears back into it.  A lot of times, it’s just weirdness that happens.  Sometimes, a child is involved.  And many times there is death.  My only problem is that these books are based in Dallas where snow is rare.  But I suppose my characters could take a vacation.

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A kelpie.

4. Kelpie or Capaill Uisce.  Both are water horses, so yes I’m putting them together.  Kelpie have the ability to shapeshift and tend toward the more playful end of things, though there’s still a lot of death around them.  Capaill Uisce, on the other hand, can’t transform and just like to kill stuff.  Capaill Uisce also come from the sea, whereas kelpie tend to be river-dwellers.  I could make either one work and they’re still pretty rare as far as current fiction goes (at least in my experience).

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5. Inugami, or dog spirits.  These are the vengeful spirits of dogs that go around possessing people and making life hell.  They’re super interesting and tend to possess members of the same family.  But the creation of one is really brutal and I’m not entirely sure I could write that kind of animal abuse.  Granted, the dog would get its revenge, but I love puppers too much.

There are a lot of other creatures I could list, but I think I’ll stop there.  What are some of your favorite monsters or mythological beings?  Are there any you would love to write about?  Or read about?  Feel free to share your own lists or comments here or on my social media pages!

Another Round of Shameless Self-Promotion

Howdy, howdy!  Can you believe July is already more than halfway over?  Neither can I.  But I must admit it’s a good month.  First and foremost, Dad’s birthday is tomorrow (happy early birthday, old man!), so drop him some birthday love here or on my social media pages and I’ll pass it along to him.  Secondly, I recently found out that a piece of mine called “Cracked and Broken” will be appearing in Harbinger Press‘s Flash Fiction Fridays.  So, I thought I would take this week’s post as a chance for some shameless self-promotion.

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For Dad.

Harbinger Press is a brand new venue that opened in March of this year and was founded by Marie Robinson and B.C. Palmer.  It will be running its first round of Flash Fiction Fridays from July 19th through November 29th. My story will appear during this time.  I will announce via social media the exact Friday it comes out, plus I will share links to the story in those posts and on my website.  In other words, if you haven’t done so already, please stalk my pages all of which can be found off to the side here or at the top of my website.  And if you want to see all of the flash fiction pieces in this series (and participate future events like the “best of 2019” contest they’ll be having for their flash fiction selections), subscribe to Harbinger Press’s newsletter, which can be found on their website linked above.

If you’re interested in submitting your own flash fiction pieces to them, their winter call opens on August 1st and runs until November 1st.  They’re open to fantasy, sci-fi, and horror according to the submission page.  I know I have some friends whose writing could fit in those categories!  Harbinger Press pays a flat rate of $25 for stories with a maximum of 1,000 words (so, basically semi-pro pay).  You can find their guidelines and the basic rights they purchase on the website I linked above.

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Borrowed from their website.

I’m extremely happy to be included in this debut batch of flash fiction.  “Cracked and Broken” is one of the few pieces I’ve written that I liked even before my writing group  gave their approval of it.  They helped me improve it a lot, so I have to thank them for the suggestions and critiques.  They know who they are.  It was also one of the first pieces I wrote after Stonecoast, without the guidance of my mentors, so it was a little scary to send it out into the world.  But I’m glad it has found a home!

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Will o’ the Wisp by Rob Powell.  Not what the story is technically about, but close enough visually.

As I mentioned above, I’ll announce when the story is released on my social media pages, so stalk me or subscribe to Harbinger Press’s newsletter to catch it when it comes out.  Next week we’ll return to our regularly scheduled program of trying to figure out this writing life.  Or maybe something cripple-focused.  I haven’t decided yet, but I’ll see you then.

The Seven Deadly Sins of Writing

Howdy, howdy!  Welcome to June.  How’s everyone doing?  Is the year going the way you were hoping so far?  Things have been weird for me with random bursts of productivity and bouts of “why bother?” generously sprinkled throughout.  I’m having more trouble than usual coming up with blog post topics, if you can’t tell.  It got me thinking about the writer’s life and wondering where I’m going wrong.  I Googled writer problems and found a few lists of “deadly sins,” but none of them quite worked for me.  Don’t get me wrong, they were cool in their own right, but many were directed toward the technical aspects of writing which aren’t where I’m having trouble.  So, I came up with my own list of seven deadly sins.

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The Seven Deadly Sins by Marta Dahlig.

1. Vanity/Pride.  The mother of all sins is dangerous for a writer, especially when we start thinking our stuff doesn’t need to be revised or changed.  When we’re not open to critique from our peers.  It’s perfect as is.  But art is never perfect.  The story may be great, but there’s always room for improvement.  A great story could become fantastic if you listen to others’ thoughts.  I never used to revise things, because they were “good enough.”  I learned a long time ago that that thinking was flawed.  Granted, I still hate revising pieces, but it’s usually because I’m not sure how to implement the changes I want to include.

2. Avarice/Greed.  Writing isn’t really a gig to get into if you’re just looking to make some quick money.  I mean, it would be nice to earn a comfortable living off of it and it’s totally fine to daydream about, but let’s be honest… we aren’t all Stephen King or J.K. Rowling.  And that’s okay.  It doesn’t make us any lesser as writers.  They work hard just like we do, but they eventually got lucky.  If we persevere, we might get lucky too.  But don’t expect an easy payday in this line of work.

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Don’t be like Greed from FMA.

3. Wrath.  If constant rejection and critique upsets you, writing isn’t the job for you.  This is one of the few things I haven’t really been bothered by.  If someone dislikes my work or thinks I need to change things, that’s their opinions.  I take what’s useful to me and put the rest aside.  As far as rejections go, in total I’m nearing 300.  It’s just part of writing.  It stings sometimes, which is fine.  We’re human.  We’re allowed to get upset.  But if it stops you from submitting, then you won’t last long as a writer.

4. Gluttony.  If you do anything too much, you’re going to burn yourself out.  This includes writing and reading.  I do this a lot on both fronts, but especially with writing.  I’ll get in a good rhythm and forget to take a break until I hit a wall and the words just won’t come, then I fall into a bout of laziness (see Sloth).  I know it’s super hard to find a balance, but remember to take a break now and then.

5. Sloth.  You remember that laziness I was just talking about?  This is that.  For me, sloth is putting off writing until I know what I want to say, which never happens.  I have a general idea of the story, but I don’t really know where it’s going until I start writing.  I know this.  Yet I still get lazy and use plotting as an excuse not to write.  But if you never actually write anything, you’re not really a writer.

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Because sloths are cute.

6. Envy.  I am guilty of this.  Of course I support my writer friends unconditionally, but I admit to feeling the occasional twinge of jealousy.  Humans do this and as much as I hate to admit it, I’m human.  I don’t let it get in the way of being excited for them and cheering them on, though.  Writing is lonely enough.  If you start getting upset and jealous at others’ successes, it’s just going to get lonelier.

7. Lust.  I had a hard time making this one work for writing, but then I thought about the fact that we all have authors we lust after in one way or another.  A lot of times it even appears in our work because we imitate them.  Imitation is a good teaching tool, but if writers don’t make the style their own, it comes off as derivative.  So, lust after whoever you want, but don’t just copy them.  Make it your own.

And that’s how I interpret the seven deadly sins for writing.  What do you agree with?  What would you change?  Feel free to share your thoughts and comments here or on my social media pages!

Character Introduction: Alexsandro Reyes

Hello, hello!  May is slowly coming to a close.  How is everyone doing?  Is the heat sneaking up on you, yet?  It’s still pretty nice around here.  Anyway, last week, I introduced you to Lucynda “Cyn” Moseman from my cozy WIP.  Now, I want to introduce you to the handsome detective who is of course a potential love interest.  What cozy would be complete without the hot cop who constantly has to save our heroine?  Not that Cyn has a tendency to get in trouble, just that that’s how cozies usually go.  Anyway, please be kind to our dear detective Alexsandro “Alex” Reyes.

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Eduardo Verastegui.

Alexsandro (32) has only been in Dallas for a couple of years after bouncing around Texas looking for a place that was the right fit.  His Armani suit and fancy shoes don’t mesh well with his detective’s salary, but that doesn’t stop him from looking sharp on and off the job.  But where does a cop get that kind of money?  It’s a secret he isn’t willing to share, but that doesn’t stop the rumor mill from churning out tall tales.  Just ask Cherry, the medical examiner who adores drama when it’s about other people and who happens to be Cyn’s bestie.  But he takes it all in stride and keeps his secrets locked behind an enigmatic smile.

Despite being a relative newb in a job surrounded by old timers, Alex has gained a certain level of respect for his abilities.  That’s why he gets assigned to Dallas’s first serial killing case in years.  It’s not like these things just fall into his lap because he’s pretty.  He’s talented too.  Although the case is horrible, he can’t help being a little happy that it pushed him into Cyn’s path.  But won’t she be angry if he has to arrest one of her employees for murder?  He can’t let that stop him from doing his job.

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And the full body.

Confidence, charm, and mystery are all qualities that Alex uses to hide his true self from the world.  It’s been a long time since anyone has been able to break through his veneer.  Can Cyn do it?  Does he want her to see the real him?  Would she understand?  These are some of the questions floating around his mind as he searches for a murderer.  Luckily, he’s a good multitasker.  And he’s fairly adept at avoiding having a personal life, so it’s not like those questions even matter.  Or do they?  Only time will tell.

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Pretty much, except he isn’t all that much like House.

At the moment, that’s Alexsandro Reyes.  I might tweak some things, but overall I like him as is.  Who’s the potential love interest in your book?  Are they harboring a secret that could change the protagonist’s feelings toward them?  Did you decide to skip the love interest altogether?  What kind of character did you replace them with?  Feel free to share your thoughts, comments, or anything else here or on my social media pages!  Next week is book review week, then I may or may not have more character intros for you.

Character Introduction: Lucynda Moseman

Howdy, howdy!  A friend recently tweeted about the fact that many writers have an idea of what the main characters in their WIPs look like and he asked for pictures or GIFs.  It made me realize that out of all my stories (shorts, novellas, and novels), I had only come up with character images for one story.  My supernatural/paranormal cozy mystery characters all have pictures associated with them, which I would reference as I was writing the first draft because the cast is large enough that I needed reminders.  Now, that novel is tucked away until I finish revising another one, but I thought I would introduce you to its main cast of characters.  First up, the protagonist: Lucynda “Cyn” Moseman.

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Yes, that’s Cody Horn.

Lucynda (30) is the owner of Dreamscapes, Dallas’s first and only host club.  It was always her dream to own some kind of club, but she never expected it to be one where most of the employees were vampires.  Thanks to her prolonged exposure to her number one host and roomie, Jyou, she’s not particularly susceptible to certain charms the vampires use to get their way.  And she’s not afraid to remind them of the rules everyone agreed upon when they came to work for her, the most important of which is “no biting the customers.”

Originally from Marfa, Cyn got out of there as fast as she could when she turned 18.  She keeps her past to herself.  So much so that even Jyou only knows bits and pieces.  However, her bestie, Cerise “Cherry” Wapachee, grew up with her and followed Cyn all the way to Dallas (not that she’d ever admit that was the reason).  Their friendship is the only non-familial connection to Marfa that Cyn maintains.

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Of course a full body shot was needed.

Quiet, sarcastic, and a natural people reader are some of the best ways to describe Cyn.  She has a weird ability to pair new guests with their ideal hosts and she’s an outgoing, friendly face that helps club customers feel at home.  But outside the club, Cyn likes to mind her own business and keep to herself, which makes being dragged into a murder investigation pretty damn awkward.  She’s a reluctant participant who winds up getting deeper and deeper into the investigation, but she doesn’t let her trepidation stop her from rising to the challenge no matter how badly she thinks it will end.

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But let’s do it anyway!

That’s Lucynda Moseman at the moment.  Do you have any characters you would like to introduce to me?  Are you the type who gathers images and creates character sheets to get to know your characters?  Or do you just wing it like I usually do and hope they seem like real people?  Feel free to share any tips about character development, characters, or general comments here or on my social media pages!  Come back next week to meet Detective Alexsandro Reyes.